DSC_1710February 2018 – Moore On Health attended the 2018 AANP Health Policy Conference in Washington D.C. and looking forward to the 2019 conference. There are over 230,000 Nurse Practitioners in the United States and each one of us should be a member of a local and/or national organization that supports, advocates and strengthens our advanced practice registered nursing profession. Nurse practitioners (NPs) have the clinical expertise and the educational background to advocate for the health care community at large. NPs are on the front lines of health care and can relate personal experiences regarding how legislation can impact our patients. If you are not a member of a local and/or national organization, then allow me to encourage you to join one TODAY! 

Be Brave Be Bold but Be Kind as we stand up to eradicate the unnecessary barriers preventing full direct access to care. DSC_1907

Every NP must be involved in health policy at some level. Our job is not only in the hospital, clinic, home visit or classroom. We also have a duty to provide impactful positive change in health care that will benefit multiple generations. We are leaders in the nursing profession on the front lines delivering evidence based practice care, but together we can significantly improve the health of patients through our involvement on health care policies. Let us not struggle with who’s at the table but make the table large for all APRNs. One Voice One Profession One Mission – full direct access to care for the community at large. 

The federal policies that we urged the 115th Congress to improve patient access to less costly, more efficient health care, by taking action to address the following priorities: 

Cosponsor S. 445/H.R. 1825 to Amend Title XVIII of Social Security Act to Ensure Moe Timely Access to Home Health Services for Medicare Beneficiaries Under the Medicare Program. This Legislation Would Authorize Nurse Practitioners (NPs) to Certify Patient Eligibility for Medicare Home Health Services.

Cosponsor H.R. 1160 to improve the way beneficiaries are assigned under the Medicare shared saving program. This legislation would allow the assignment of Nurse Practitioner patients to Medicare shared saving ACOs. 

Cosponsor H.R. 1617 to Ensure Diabetic Patient’s Access to Therapeutic Shoes

We encourage Congress to craft legislation that: protects patient choice by ensuring that health care delivered by Nurse Practitioner is covered by insurance and other healthcare options. 27788870_1583461691690825_8140704533934564643_o.jpg27654609_1583418211695173_5962594335214322604_nWe have more than 50 years of peer-reviewed, independent research showing Nurse Practitioners to be safe and cost-effective clinicians, with patient outcomes that are similar and sometimes better than those of physicians.

What are the Adverse Health Effects that Lead Exposure
The Adverse Health Effects with Lead Exposure

According to the Mayo Clinic, lead poisoning can be hard to detect — even people who seem healthy can have high blood levels of lead. Signs and symptoms usually don’t appear until dangerous amounts have accumulated. Sources of Lead – was also once a key ingredient in paint and gasoline and is still used in batteries, solder, pipes, pottery, roofing materials and some cosmetics.

Exposure to Lead –  to even low levels of lead can cause damage over time, especially in children. The greatest risk is to brain development, where irreversible damage may occur. Higher levels can damage the kidneys and nervous system in both children and adults. Very high lead levels may cause seizures, unconsciousness and possibly death.

Lead Poisoning Symptoms in Children – The signs and symptoms of lead poisoning in children may include:

  • Developmental delay

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    Flint, Michigan, Lead Toxic Water
  • Learning difficulties
  • Irritability
  • Loss of appetite
  • Weight loss
  • Sluggishness and fatigue
  • Abdominal pain
  • Vomiting
  • Constipation
  • Hearing loss

Lead Poisoning Symptoms in Newborns – Babies who are exposed to lead before birth may experience:

  • Learning difficulties
  • Slowed growth

Lead Poisoning Treatment – For more-severe cases, your doctor may recommend:

  • Chelation therapy. In this treatment, you take a medication that binds with the lead so that it’s excreted in your urine.
  • EDTA therapy. Doctors treat adults with lead levels greater than 45 mcg/dL of blood with one or more of three drugs, most commonly a chemical called ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA). Depending on your lead level, you may need more than one treatment. In such severe cases, however, it may not be possible to reverse damage that has already occurred.

Lead Poisoning May Have Multi-Generational Effects – An NIEHS-funded study showed that mothers with high neonatal blood levels of lead — indicating that the mothers themselves experienced lead exposure in the womb — can bring about epigenetic changes in their unborn children. This study is one of the first to show that an environmental exposure in pregnant mothers can have an epigenetic effect on DNA methylation in their grandchildren.

Mayo Clinic – Lead Poisoning  / National Library of Medicine / National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences / CNN- Flint Water Crisis Fast Facts