May is Celiac Disease Awareness Month

May is Celiac Disease Awareness Month.

It affects about one in 141 people in the United States. Many people with the condition remain undiagnosed.

Celiac disease is an immune reaction to gluten, a protein found in wheat, rye, and barley.

Celiac Disease

National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases

NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services

**The Gluten-Free Diet: Some Examples

In 2006, the American Dietetic Association updated its recommendations for a gluten-free diet. The following chart is based on the 2006 recommendations. This list is not complete, so people with celiac disease should discuss gluten-free food choices with a dietitian or physician who specializes in celiac disease. People with celiac disease should always read food ingredient lists carefully to make sure that the food does not contain gluten.

Adapted from the following resource: Thompson T. Celiac Disease Nutrition Guide. 2nd ed. Chicago: American Dietetic Association; 2006. Used with permission. For a complete copy of the Celiac Disease Nutrition Guide, please visit http://www.eatright.org.

Allowed Foods

Amaranth, Arrowroot, Buckwheat ,Cassava, Corn

Flax Indian rice grass

Job’s tears ,Legumes Millet Nuts, Potatoes, Quinoa, Rice

Sago Seeds Soy Sorghum, Tapioca, & Wild Rice Yucca

Foods To Avoid

Wheat

• Including einkorn, emmer, spelt, kamut

• Wheat starch, wheat bran, wheat germ, cracked wheat, hydrolyzed wheat protein

Barley Rye

Triticale (a cross between wheat and rye)

Other Wheat Products

Bromated flour Durum, flour Enriched flour, Farina

Graham flour, Phosphated flour, Plain flour

Self-rising flour, Semolina White flour

Processed Foods that May Contain Wheat, Barley, or Rye*

Bouillon cubes, Brown rice syrup, Chips/potato chips, Candy

Cold cuts, hot dogs, salami, sausage

French fries, Gravy Imitation, fish, Matzo

Rice mixes, Sauces,

Seasoned tortilla chips, Self-basting turkey Soups, Soy sauce

Vegetables in sauce &

Communion wafer

Most of these foods can be found gluten-free. When in doubt, check with the food manufacturer.

 

**For a complete copy of the Celiac Disease Nutrition Guide,

please visit http://www.eatright.org.

Other Sources:

http://www.digestive.niddk.nih.gov.

http://www.celiac.nih.gov/Resources_HCProviders.aspx

http://digestive.niddk.nih.gov/ddiseases/pubs/celiac/index.aspx#examples

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